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Tony Kline Collection


The Tony Kline Collection presents modern high-quality translations of classic texts by famous poets as well as original poetry and critical works.

 
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Nature and Spirit

By: A.S. Kline

Classic Literature

Excerpt: Then With The Dead. Then with the dead we shall see what all this being-here meant, not the dark god trembling in shade, not the transubstantiation, the sift of dust, of ashes that once were hearts, of sand that once was bone, nor the absence or presence, but something else, process of mind, that which we really were, moving with insubstantial things, in the sea of time, and not now among angels, or men, but out there with the earth and its creatures.

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Selected Poems of Pablo Neruda

By: Pablo Neruda ; Translated by A.S. Kline

Classic Literature

Excerpt: One time more, my love, the net of light extinguishes One time more, my love, the net of light extinguishes work, wheels, flames, boredoms and farewells, and we surrender the swaying wheat to night, the wheat that noon stole from earth and light. The moon alone in the midst of its clear page sustains the pillars of Heaven?s Bay, the room acquires the slowness of gold, and your hands go here and there preparing night. O love, O night. O cupola ringed by a river o...

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Selected Poems of Pablo Neruda

By: Pablo Neruda ; Translated by A.S. Kline

Classic Literature

Excerpt: One time more, my love, the net of light extinguishes time more, my love, the net of light extinguishes work, wheels, flames, boredoms and farewells, and we surrender the swaying wheat to night, the wheat that noon stole from earth and light. The moon alone in the midst of its clear page sustains the pillars of Heaven?s Bay, the room acquires the slowness of gold, and your hands go here and there preparing night. O love, O night. O cupola ringed by a river of im...

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No Roots Except in Air

By: A.S. Kline

Classic Literature

Excerpt: Try It Yourself. The dislocation of the art of our century is also visible in poetry. Minds are not less but the Void is nearer, the blind reality. Though the pain of being can still be opposed by form, truth, beauty, to speak with dead voices is incomplete, while our silence deepens eternity.

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The Odyssey

By: Homer ; Translated by A.S. Kline

Classic Literature

Excerpt: Tell me, Muse, of that man of many resources, who wandered far and wide, after sacking the holy citadel of Troy. Many the men whose 19 cities he saw, whose ways he learned. Many the sorrows he suffered at sea, while trying to bring himself and his friends back alive. Yet despite his wishes he failed to save them, because of their own un-wisdom, foolishly eating the cattle of Helios, the Sun, so the god denied them their return. Tell us of these things, beginning...

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The Odyssey

By: Homer ; Translated by A.S. Kline

Classic Literature

Excerpt: Tell me, Muse, of that man of many resources, who wandered far and wide, after sacking the holy citadel of Troy. Many the men whose 19 cities he saw, whose ways he learned. Many the sorrows he suffered at sea, while trying to bring himself and his friends back alive. Yet despite his wishes he failed to save them, because of their own un-wisdom, foolishly eating the cattle of Helios, the Sun, so the god denied them their return. Tell us of these things, beginning...

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Oedipus Rex

By: Sophocles ; Translated by George Theodoridis

Classic Literature

Excerpt: The palace has three doors Oedipus will use the central door his attendants when dispatched by him will use the door at S.R. and his wife.

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Oedipus Rex

By: Sophocles ; Translated by George Theodoridis

Classic Literature

Excerpt: The palace has three doors Oedipus will use the central door his attendants when dispatched by him will use the door at S.R. and his wife.

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The Amores

By: Publius Ovidius Naso (Ovid) ; Translated by A.S. Kline

Classic Literature

Excerpt: His Epigram: We were once five books are now three; The author preferred work this way Now if it no joy to you to read us, still it s a lighter punishment with books less.

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The Amores

By: Publius Ovidius Naso (Ovid) ; Translated by A.S. Kline

Classic Literature

Excerpt: His Epigram: We were once five books are now three; The author preferred work this way Now if it no joy to you to read us, still it s a lighter punishment with books less.

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Fasti

By: Publius Ovidius Naso (Ovid) ; Translated by A.S. Kline

Classic Literature

Translator?s Note: Ovid?s numerous references throughout the Fasti to the rising and setting of stars and constellations, further detailed in the relevant index entries, have been checked using a computer-based astronomical program (Redshift 4) set to Rome in 8AD. The Kalends, Nones, Ides, and major Festivals of each month are identified in the headings against the relevant days.

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Fasti

By: Publius Ovidius Naso (Ovid) ; Translated by A.S. Kline

Classic Literature

Translator?s Note: Ovid?s numerous references throughout the Fasti to the rising and setting of stars and constellations, further detailed in the relevant index entries, have been checked using a computer-based astronomical program (Redshift 4) set to Rome in 8AD. The Kalends, Nones, Ides, and major Festivals of each month are identified in the headings against the relevant days.

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The Metamorphoses

By: Publius Ovidius Naso (Ovid) ; Translated by A.S. Kline

Classic Literature

Excerpt: I want to speak about bodies changed into new forms. You, gods, since you are the ones who alter these, and all other things, inspire my attempt, and spin out a continuous thread of words, from the world?s first origins to my own time...

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The Metamorphoses

By: Publius Ovidius Naso (Ovid) ; Translated by A.S. Kline

Classic Literature

Excerpt: I want to speak about bodies changed into new forms. You, gods, since you are the ones who alter these, and all other things, inspire my attempt, and spin out a continuous thread of words, from the world?s first origins to my own time...

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The Poems of Exile

By: Publius Ovidius Naso (Ovid) ; Translated by A.S. Kline

Classic Literature

Excerpt: The poet His Book; Its Nature Little book, go without me ? I don?t begrudge it ? to the city. Ah, alas, that your master?s not allowed to go! Go, but without ornament, as is fitting for an exile?s: sad one, wear the clothing of these times. You?ll not be cloaked, dyed with hyacinthine purple ? that?s no fitting colour to go mourning ? no vermilion title, no cedar-oiled paper, no white bosses, ?horns? to your dark ?brow?. Happier books are decorated with these th...

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The Poems of Exile

By: Publius Ovidius Naso (Ovid) ; Translated by A.S. Kline

Classic Literature

Excerpt: The poet His Book; Its Nature Little book, go without me ? I don?t begrudge it ? to the city. Ah, alas, that your master?s not allowed to go! Go, but without ornament, as is fitting for an exile?s: sad one, wear the clothing of these times. You?ll not be cloaked, dyed with hyacinthine purple ? that?s no fitting colour to go mourning ? no vermilion title, no cedar-oiled paper, no white bosses, ?horns? to your dark ?brow?. Happier books are decorated with these th...

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Twenty-Two Poems

By: Boris Pasternak ; Translated by A.S. Kline

Classic Literature

Excerpt: February. Take ink and weep, February. Take ink and weep, write February as you?re sobbing, while black Spring burns deep through the slush and throbbing. Take a cab. For a clutch of copecks, through bell-towers? and wheel noise, go where the rain-storm?s din breaks, greater than crying or ink employs. Where rooks in thousands falling, like charred pears from the skies, drop down into puddles, bringing cold grief to the depths of eyes. Below, the black shows thr...

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Twenty-Two Poems

By: Boris Pasternak ; Translated by A.S. Kline

Classic Literature

Excerpt: February. Take ink and weep, February. Take ink and weep, write February as you?re sobbing, while black Spring burns deep through the slush and throbbing. Take a cab. For a clutch of copecks, through bell-towers? and wheel noise, go where the rain-storm?s din breaks, greater than crying or ink employs. Where rooks in thousands falling, like charred pears from the skies, drop down into puddles, bringing cold grief to the depths of eyes. Below, the black shows thr...

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Peace

By: Aristophanes ; Translated by George Theodoridis

Classic Literature

Excerpt: Hierocles (a spinner and seller of oracles); Sickle Maker; Cask Maker (mate to Sickle maker -silent); Arms Dealer; Helmet Maker (mate to Helmet maker -silent); Spear Maker (mate to Helmet maker -silent); Boy 1; Boy 2; Peace (a divinity -silent); Eyeful (an attendant to Peace -silent); Plentiful (an attendant to Peace -silent); Aristophanes (as himself).

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Peace

By: Aristophanes ; Translated by George Theodoridis

Classic Literature

Excerpt: Hierocles (a spinner and seller of oracles); Sickle Maker; Cask Maker (mate to Sickle maker -silent); Arms Dealer; Helmet Maker (mate to Helmet maker -silent); Spear Maker (mate to Helmet maker -silent); Boy 1; Boy 2; Peace (a divinity -silent); Eyeful (an attendant to Peace -silent); Plentiful (an attendant to Peace -silent); Aristophanes (as himself).

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