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Tony Kline Collection


The Tony Kline Collection presents modern high-quality translations of classic texts by famous poets as well as original poetry and critical works.

 
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Words from Cold Mountain

By: Han-shan ; Translated by A.S. Kline

Classic Literature

Introduction: Han-shan, the Master of Cold Mountain, and his friend Shi-te, lived in the late-eighth to early-ninth century AD, in the sacred T?ien-t?ai Mountains of Chekiang Province, south of the bay of Hangchow. The two laughing friends, holding hands, come and go, but mostly go, dashing into the wild, careless of others? reality, secure in their own. As Han-shan himself says, his Zen is not in the poems. Zen is in the mind.

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Selected Poems of Heinrich Heine

By: Heinrich Heine ; Translated by A.S. Kline

Classic Literature

Excerpt: Buch Der Lieder. Lyrisches Intermezzo. ?Ein Fichtenbaum? A single fir-tree, lonely, On a northern mountain height, Sleeps in a white blanket, Draped in snow and ice. His dreams are of a palm-tree, Who, far in eastern lands, Weeps, all alone and silent, Among the burning sands.

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Selected Poems of Heinrich Heine

By: Heinrich Heine ; Translated by A.S. Kline

Classic Literature

Excerpt: Buch Der Lieder. Lyrisches Intermezzo. ?Ein Fichtenbaum? A single fir-tree, lonely, On a northern mountain height, Sleeps in a white blanket, Draped in snow and ice. His dreams are of a palm-tree, Who, far in eastern lands, Weeps, all alone and silent, Among the burning sands.

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Twenty Poems of Miguel Hern Ndez

By: Miguel Hernandez ; Translated by A.S. Kline

Classic Literature

Excerpt: You Threw Me A Lemon' ( IV:From'EI Rayo Que No Cesa) You threw me a Iemon, bitter, with a hand warm and so pure, that its shape was not spiled, and I tasted its bitterness regardless...

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Twenty Poems of Miguel Hern Ndez

By: Miguel Hernandez ; Translated by A.S. Kline

Classic Literature

Excerpt: You Threw Me A Lemon' ( IV:From'EI Rayo Que No Cesa) You threw me a Iemon, bitter, with a hand warm and so pure, that its shape was not spiled, and I tasted its bitterness regardless...

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The Heroides

By: Publius Ovidius Naso (Ovid) ; Translated by A.S. Kline

Classic Literature

Excerpt: Penelope to Ulysses. Your Penelope sends you this, Ulysses, the so-longdelayed. Don?t reply to me however: come yourself. Troy lies in ruins, an enemy, indeed, to the girls of Greece - Priam, and all of Troy, were scarcely worth this! O I wish, at that time when he sought Sparta with his fleet, Paris, the adulterer, had been whelmed beneath angry seas! I would not have lain here, cold in an empty bed, nor be left behind, to complain, at suffering long days, nor ...

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The Heroides

By: Publius Ovidius Naso (Ovid) ; Translated by A.S. Kline

Classic Literature

Excerpt: Penelope to Ulysses. Your Penelope sends you this, Ulysses, the so-longdelayed. Don?t reply to me however: come yourself. Troy lies in ruins, an enemy, indeed, to the girls of Greece - Priam, and all of Troy, were scarcely worth this! O I wish, at that time when he sought Sparta with his fleet, Paris, the adulterer, had been whelmed beneath angry seas! I would not have lain here, cold in an empty bed, nor be left behind, to complain, at suffering long days, nor ...

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The Epodes and Carmen Seculare of Horace: With a Vocabulary, And S...

By: Quintus Horatius (Horace) Flaccus ; Translated by A.S. Kline

Classic Literature

Excerpt: I have attempted an equivalent in English of Horace?s use of Greek metres. Basically the number of metric beats in the Latin feet is reflected by English syllables, and the lines flexed to produce as decent an effect as possible. Rhythm is all important in such an attempt. It should be understood that the natural English line has five strong beats. Equally it can often sound strange when extended to accommodate more. I have not attempted to mirror the long and s...

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The Epodes and Carmen Seculare of Horace: With a Vocabulary, And S...

By: Quintus Horatius (Horace) Flaccus ; Translated by A.S. Kline

Classic Literature

Excerpt: I have attempted an equivalent in English of Horace?s use of Greek metres. Basically the number of metric beats in the Latin feet is reflected by English syllables, and the lines flexed to produce as decent an effect as possible. Rhythm is all important in such an attempt. It should be understood that the natural English line has five strong beats. Equally it can often sound strange when extended to accommodate more. I have not attempted to mirror the long and s...

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Quintus Horatius Flaccus

By: Quintus Horatius (Horace) Flaccus ; Translated by A.S. Kline

Classic Literature

Excerpt: Maecenas, descendant of royal ancestors, O my protector, and my sweet glory, some are delighted by showers of dust, Olympic dust, over their chariots, they are raised to the gods, as Earth?s masters, by posts clipping the red-hot wheels, by noble palms: this man, if the fickle crowd of Citizens compete to lift him to triple honors: that one, if he?s stored away in his granary whatever he gleaned from the Libyan threshing. The peasant who loves to break clods in ...

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Quintus Horatius Flaccus

By: Quintus Horatius (Horace) Flaccus ; Translated by A.S. Kline

Classic Literature

Excerpt: Maecenas, descendant of royal ancestors, O my protector, and my sweet glory, some are delighted by showers of dust, Olympic dust, over their chariots, they are raised to the gods, as Earth?s masters, by posts clipping the red-hot wheels, by noble palms: this man, if the fickle crowd of Citizens compete to lift him to triple honors: that one, if he?s stored away in his granary whatever he gleaned from the Libyan threshing. The peasant who loves to break clods in ...

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Quintus Horatius Flaccus

By: Quintus Horatius (Horace) Flaccus ; Translated by A.S. Kline

Classic Literature

Excerpt: How come, Maecenas, no one alive?s ever content With the lot he chose or the one fate threw in his way, But praises those who pursue some alternative track? ?O fortunate tradesman!? the ageing soldier cries Body shattered by harsh service, bowed by the years. The merchant however, ship tossed by a southern gale, Says: ?Soldiering?s better. And why? You charge and then: It?s a quick death in a moment, or a joyful victory won.? When a client knocks hard on his doo...

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Quintus Horatius Flaccus

By: Quintus Horatius (Horace) Flaccus ; Translated by A.S. Kline

Classic Literature

Excerpt: How come, Maecenas, no one alive?s ever content With the lot he chose or the one fate threw in his way, But praises those who pursue some alternative track? ?O fortunate tradesman!? the ageing soldier cries Body shattered by harsh service, bowed by the years. The merchant however, ship tossed by a southern gale, Says: ?Soldiering?s better. And why? You charge and then: It?s a quick death in a moment, or a joyful victory won.? When a client knocks hard on his doo...

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Italian Poetry to 1600

By: Various ; Translated by A.S. Kline

Classic Literature

Excerpt: Jacopo Da Lentino (c1200-1250). I have placed my heart in God?s service So that I might ascend to Heaven, To the holy place where I have heard, There?s always laughter, joy and fun: I?d not want to go without my Lady, Of the clear brow, and golden hair, Without her I could never be happy, Separated from my Lady fair. But I do not speak with real intent Of committing any sin if I should say, I?ll not see her lovely movement, Her gentle look and lovely face: For I...

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Italian Poetry to 1601

By: Various ; Translated by A.S. Kline

Classic Literature

Excerpt: Jacopo Da Lentino (c1200-1250). I have placed my heart in God?s service So that I might ascend to Heaven, To the holy place where I have heard, There?s always laughter, joy and fun: I?d not want to go without my Lady, Of the clear brow, and golden hair, Without her I could never be happy, Separated from my Lady fair. But I do not speak with real intent Of committing any sin if I should say, I?ll not see her lovely movement, Her gentle look and lovely face: For I...

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The Canti

By: Giacomo Leopardi ; Translated by A.S. Kline

Classic Literature

Excerpt: The poems below are complete but not in their originally published order. I have taken the liberty of re-arranging them into four groups, Personal (Poems 1-11), Philosophical (12-24), ?Romantic? (25-34), and Political (35-41). These categories are not exact, as Leopardi frequently blends elements together in the one poem, but they may help the reader, as they helped me, to adjust to his variations in style. The original published position of each poem is given i...

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The Canti

By: Giacomo Leopardi ; Translated by A.S. Kline

Classic Literature

Excerpt: The poems below are complete but not in their originally published order. I have taken the liberty of re-arranging them into four groups, Personal (Poems 1-11), Philosophical (12-24), ?Romantic? (25-34), and Political (35-41). These categories are not exact, as Leopardi frequently blends elements together in the one poem, but they may help the reader, as they helped me, to adjust to his variations in style. The original published position of each poem is given i...

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The Presence of Light

By: A.S. Kline

Classic Literature

Excerpt: Sacred, given in the light, years do not count, inviolable the creature, your origin, say, say the spell, you know it. Say nature, heart?s beauty, heart-heavy pain of her going, say the given not made. You take...

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The Presence of Light

By: A.S. Kline

Classic Literature

Excerpt: Sacred, given in the light, years do not count, inviolable the creature, your origin, say, say the spell, you know it. Say nature, heart?s beauty, heart-heavy pain of her going, say the given not made. You take...

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Like Water or Clouds : The T'An Dynasty and the Tao

By: A.S. Kline

Classic Literature

Excerpt: There is a problem for the reader of books about China and the Chinese, or of Chinese poems in translation, due to the variation in spelling of Chinese names and terms. This is caused by the many systems of transliteration used in the past when rendering Chinese names into English. It may make it difficult for the reader who knows no Chinese to recognize the same person place or term in different guises. Modern China uses the Pinyin system (e.g. Beijing for Peki...

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